Giles Resort 2013

Giles Deacon’s namesake pre-collection has a ‘delirious essence’, according to Mr.Tim Blanks on Style.com.  Indeed, there is a lot going on in Deacon’s line– the presentation is similar to Masha Reva’s Merging project.  The designer used his own photographs from the Castle Howard (Where Evelyn Waugh’s novel Brideshead Revisited was filmed) printed onto an elegant silk fabric and wrapped into lovely evening dresses with cool grey and blue hues. However, some of those statues he caught on camera were headless.  What’s a maverick to do?  Stick on a cartoon head with oversized bob-cut hair and red lips, of course!  Additionally, there was a colorful tromp-l’oeil (yay) element that Deacon worked in to his prints.  A few more cartoon prints were tailored in a classic fashion– shift dresses, cropped trousers.

Wearable?  Yes.  But Deacon also incorporated several ultra-classic options for those a bit less daring and, probably, for sales. Bringing Spring 2012′s trend of sweet pastels and A-line dresses along, the second half of the Giles Resort collection was pretty.  Yet, far less sticky-gamine than much of the current year’s look.  Tweeds, smart Spring coats, and cropped boleros made these looks much more sophisticated.

Would do you think of Deacon’s cartoony prints?  Would you wear them?

Masha Reva: Merging

“Today a human is surrounded by huge amount of information, while social networks and blogs bring us an opportunity to create a superficial representation of ourselves in the web. Becoming a part of virtual reality, a computer data, we merge within the boundless informational field that is internet.”- Masha Reva

Ukrainian designer/artist Masha Reva has a good point.  She emphasizes her ideas with a mixing of interesting prints, various shapes and textures, over a backdrop of busy imagery: saturated, to say the least.  The ‘merging’ of images, words, and actions have long been part of the quotidian, but throw in the Internet and those daily stimuli come ten-fold.
To show the critique of today’s digital normalcy in a photograph is interesting.  Many mediums (articles, documentaries, organizations!) have touched on the 21th Century’s overload of information, but somehow these images seem to say so much without any explanations.  The viewer is left to contemplate how Masha’s message comes across for him/herself personally.
For me, I half want to get off the computer and just go lay in the sunshine/half want to look up more awesome pictures and use Pinterest all afternoon.  How do you feel about them?  How do you deal with an info overload?  X
More info!:  Masha Reva is also creating shoes!  Look at these lovelies!  All images via.

William Morris

The man himself (via william-morris.co.uk)

The man himself (via william-morris.co.uk)

It’s been said that this guy was the most influential designer of the 19th century.  I believe it- check out these patterns! William Morris started the English Arts and Crafts movement, an anti-industrial revival of traditional craftsmanship.  Morris wore many hats.  Aside from being an accomplished textile designer, he was a scholar, writer, poet, socialist, and environmental campaigner.  The company that the designer created along with his buddies Peter Paul Marshall and Charles James Faulkner is still going strong today.  Morris & Co. offers those same patterns of the artist as well as new interpretations of the originals.  Lovely, intricate prints that are so fresh and timeless.  Brava, Morris.  Brava.

P.S. If you find yourself in London, you can visit Morris’ home.  Though I might be tempted to stuff one of his pillows into the extra-large bag I would just happen to be carrying.

Fruit Wallpaper (1864) (via william-morris.co.uk)

Fruit Wallpaper (1864) (via william-morris.co.uk)

Marigold curtains (1875) (via morris-william.co.uk)

Marigold curtains (1875) (via morris-william.co.uk)

Pimpernel.  Morris had this design as wallpaper in his dining room (via morris-william.co.uk)

Pimpernel. Morris had this design as wallpaper in his dining room (via morris-william.co.uk)

Artichoke.  Yum.  (via morris-william.co.uk)

Artichoke. Yum. (via morris-william.co.uk)

Tulip and Willow design wood-block fabric (via wikipedia.org)

Tulip and Willow design wood-block fabric (via wikipedia.org)